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Abraxas, from the Encyclopedia of Demons and Demonology

Demons are very popular in modern belief and can be broken down in three categories.

Hell Demons: The "Actual" demons, as in the ones that are born from all the Hate and all evil in Hell, along with the Dark Fallen Angels.

Dimensional Demons: Beings that inhabit different dimensions or planes of existence. They could have dark intentions or be born out of spite, vile, and evil. These demons usually have an epheral existance or a not very solid composition in our plane of reality and the physical.

Earth's Demons: Beings that inhabit the Earth.

From the Greek 'daimon', or spirit, demons are powerful supernatural beings existing between god(s) and humans. Traditionally benevolent, daimon began to take on sinister themes within the writings of Plato. When the Old Testament was translated from Hebrew to Greek, the word mal'ak was used to describe foreign or evil supernatural beings. In the New Testament writings, most of which were written in Greek originally, the word daimon became associated with Satan and his minions and thusly took on a distinctly evil meaning.

As Christianity continued to spread, the word demon came to describe many of the traditional animistic spirits of Northern Europe which those carrying Christianity into the region preached against. The very name of demons has been co-opted to describe this process, the "demonizing" of foreign or contrary mythologies in the interest of spreading an invasive belief system.

The classical Greek daimon, Pan, was a nature spirit. The goat-like features of Pan have been adopted by Christian imagery in particular as those of demons. While Pan and other daimons gave their name to the Christian demons, their habits and nature as unpleasant beings of the underworld/death more resemble an amalgam of many other creatures from Mediterranean mythology, including the netherworld guards of Greece and Egypt.

Hebrew and Christian culture considered all demons evil. In 1589, a leading expert named Brinsfield listed major demons and their specialties. These included: Lucifer, pride; Satan, anger; Beelzebub, gluttony; and Belphegor, sloth.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lists_of_demons

Demons walk the earth. They can take animal or human form. The numerous types and forms of demons have been listed below:

  • Amon(Aamon) (Christian demonology)
  • Abaddon (Christian demonology)
  • Abalam (Christian demonology)
  • Abraxas (Gnosticism)
  • Abyzou (Jewish mythology)
  • Ad-Dajjal (a.k.a. Dajjal) (Islamic eschatology)
  • Adramelech (Assyrian mythology)
  • Aeshma (Zoroastrianism)
  • Agaliarept (Jewish mythology)
  • Agares (Christian demonology)
  • Agiel (Jewish mythology)
  • Ahriman/Angra Mainyu (Zoroastrianism)
  • Aim (Christian demonology)
  • Akem Manah/Akoman/Akvan (Zoroastrianism)
  • Ala (Slavic mythology)
  • Alal (Chaldean mythology)
  • Alastor (Christian demonology)
  • Alloces (Christian demonology)
  • Allu (Akkadian mythology)
  • Amaymon (Christian demonology)
  • Amdusias (Christian demonology)
  • Ammut (Egyptian mythology)
  • Anamalech (Assyrian mythology)
  • Anzu (Sumerian mythology)
  • Amy (Christian demonology)
  • Andhaka (Hindu mythology)
  • Andras (Christian demonology)
  • Andrealphus (Christian demonology)
  • Andromalius (Christian demonology)
  • Antichrist (Christian demonology)
  • Apep (a.k.a. Apophis) (Egyptian mythology)
  • Apollyon (Christian demonology)
  • Armaros (Christian demonology)
  • Asag (Sumerian mythology)
  • Asb'el (Jewish mythology)
  • Asmodai/Asmodeus (Jewish folklore and Christian demonology)
  • Astaroth (Christian demonology)
  • Astarte (Semitic mythology)
  • Asura (Hindu mythology)
  • Azazel (Jewish demonology) and (Islamic mythology)
  • Azi Dahaka/Dahak (Zoroastrianism)
  • Baal (Christian demonology)
  • Balam (Christian demonology)
  • Balberith (Jewish demonology)
  • Bali Raj (Hindu mythology)
  • Banshee (Irish mythology)
  • Baphomet (Demon, or image/idol thereof)
  • Barbas (Christian demonology)
  • Barbatos (Christian demonology)
  • Bathin (Christian demonology)
  • Beelzebub (Jewish demonology, Christian demonology)
  • Behemoth (Jewish demonology)
  • Beherit (Phoenician mythology)
  • Belial (Jewish demonology, Christian demonology)
  • Beleth (Christian demonology)
  • Belphegor (Christian demonology)
  • Berith (Christian demonology)
  • Bies (Slavic Mythology)
  • Bifrons (Christian demonology)
  • Boruta (Slavic mythology)
  • Botis (Christian demonology)
  • Buer (Christian demonology)
  • Bukavac (Slavic mythology)
  • Bune (Christian demonology)
  • Bushyasta (Zoroastrianism)
  • Caacrinolaas (Christian demonology)
  • Caim (Christian demonology)
  • Charun (Etruscan mythology)
  • Chemosh (Moabite mythology)
  • Chupacabra (Latin American mythology)
  • Cimejes (Christian demonology)
  • Corson (Christian demonology)
  • Crocell (Christian demonology)
  • Crone (Christian demonology)
  • Culsu (Etruscan mythology)
  • Dagon (Semitic mythology)
  • Dantalion (Christian demonology)
  • Danjal (Jewish mythology)
  • Dasa (Hindu mythology)
  • Davy Jones (sailor lore)
  • Decarabia (Christian demonology)
  • Demogorgon (Christian demonology)
  • Devil (Christian demonology)
  • Div-e Sepid (Persian mythology)
  • Djinn (Islamic mythology)
  • Donn (Irish mythology)
  • Drekavac (Slavic mythology)
  • Dumah (Jewish demonology)
  • Eligos (Christian demonology)
  • Empusa (Greek mythology)
  • Euryale (Greek mythology)
  • Eurynome (Greek mythology)
  • Eurynomos (Greek mythology)
  • Familiars (Christian demonology)
  • Focalor (Christian demonology)
  • Foras (Christian demonology)
  • Forneus (Christian demonology)
  • Furies (Roman mythology)
  • Furcas (Christian demonology)
  • Furfur (Christian demonology)
  • Gader'el (Jewish demonology)
  • Gaki (Japanese mythology)
  • Glasya-Labolas (Christian demonology)
  • Gorgon (Greek mythology)
  • Gremory (Christian demonology)
  • Grigori (Jewish demonology)
  • Gusion (Christian demonology)
  • Haagenti (Christian demonology)
  • Halphas (Christian demonology)
  • Haures (Christian demonology)
  • Humbaba (Sumerian mythology, Akkadian mythology)
  • Ifrit (Islamic mythology)
  • Incubus (Christian demonology, Chaldean mythology, Jewish folklore)
  • Ipos (Christian demonology)
  • Iblis (Islamic mythology)
  • Jinn (Islamic mythology)
  • Jikininki (Japanese mythology)
  • Kabhanda (Hinduism)
  • Kitsune (Japanese mythology)
  • Kobal (Christian demonology)
  • Kokb'ael (Jewish demonology)
  • Kulak (Christian demonology)
  • Labal (Christian demonology)
  • Lady Midday (Slavic Mythology)
  • La Llorona (Latin American Myth)
  • Lamia (Bulgarian folklore, Christian demonology and Greek mythology)
  • Legion (Christian demonology)
  • Lechies (Slavic mythology)
  • Leak (a.k.a. Leyak) (Indonesian/Bali demonology)
  • Lempo (Finnish mythology)
  • Leraje (Christian demonology)
  • Leviathan (Jewish demonology, Christian demonology)
  • Lilim (Jewish folklore)
  • Lilith (Sumerian mythology, Akkadian mythology, Jewish folklore)
  • Lilu (Jewish demonology)
  • Lix Tetrax (Jewish/Christian demonology)
  • Lucifer (Christian demonology)
  • Lucifuge Rofocale (Christian demonology)
  • Malphas (Christian demonology)
  • Mammon (Christian demonology)
  • Mara (Buddhist mythology, Scandinavian folklore)
  • Maricha (Hindu mythology)
  • Marax (Christian demonology)
  • Marbas (Christian demonology)
  • Marchosias (Christian demonology)
  • Mastema (Jewish demonology)
  • Mathim (Christian demonology)
  • Medusa (Greek mythology)
  • Mephistopheles (Christian folklore)
  • Merihem (Christian demonology)
  • Mictlantecuhtli (Aztec mythology)
  • Mojo (African mythology)
  • Moloch (Christian demonology)
  • Murmur (Christian demonology)
  • Naamah (Jewish demonology)
  • Naberius (Christian demonology)
  • Naberus (Christian demonology)
  • Naphula (Christian demonology)
  • Nekomata (Japanese mythology)
  • Neqa'el (Egyptian mythology)
  • Ninurta (Sumerian mythology, Akkadian mythology)
  • Nix (North-European folklore)
  • Nyai Loro Kidul (a.k.a. Nyi Roro Kidul) (Javanese mythology)
  • Obizoth (Christian demonology)
  • Onoskelis (Greek mythology)
  • Oray (Christian demonology)
  • Orcus Roman Mythology
  • Oriax (Christian demonology)
  • Orobas (Christian demonology)
  • Ose (Christian demonology)
  • Oni (Japanese demonology)
  • Paimon (Christian demonology)
  • Pazuzu (Sumerian mythology, Akkadian mythology)
  • Penemue (Jewish mythology)
  • Phenex (Christian demonology)
  • Pithius (Christian demonology)
  • Pocong (Melayu, Indonesian demonology)
  • Pontianak (a.k.a. Kuntilanak) (Indonesian demonology)
  • Popobawa (Zanzibar demonology)
  • Procell (Christian demonology)
  • Pruflas (Christian demonology)
  • Psoglav (Slavic Mythology)
  • Purson (Christian demonology)
  • Putana (Hindu mythology)
  • Raging Demon (Christian demonology)
  • Rahab (Jewish folklore)
  • Rahovart (European folklore)
  • Raiju (Japanese mythology)
  • Rakshasa (Hindu mythology)
  • Rangda (Balinese mythology)
  • Raum (Christian demonology)
  • Ravana (Hindu mythology - also seen by some Hindus as an aspect of the God Shiva)
  • Razakel (European folklore)
  • Ronove (Christian demonology)
  • Rosier (Christian demonology)
  • Rumjal (Jewish demonology)
  • Rusalka (Slavic mythology)
  • Sabnock (Christian demonology)
  • Saiko (Christian demonology)
  • Sallos (Christian demonology)
  • Salpsan, Satan's son (Apocryphal Gospel of Bartholomew)
  • Samael (Jewish demonology)
  • Satan (Jewish demonology, Christian demonology, Islamic mythology)
  • Satanachia (Christian demonology)
  • Scox (Christian demonology)
  • Seere (Christian demonology)
  • Semyazza (Jewish demonology)
  • Set (Egyptian mythology during the Second Intermediate Period)
  • Shaitan (Islamic mythology)
  • Shax (Christian demonology)
  • Shedim (Jewish folklore)
  • Shezmu (Egyptian mythology)
  • Sidragasum (Christian demonology)
  • Sitri (Christian demonology)
  • Stheno (Greek mythology)
  • Stolas (Christian demonology)
  • Stuhać (Slavic Mythology)
  • Succubus (Sumerian mythology, Akkadian mythology, Jewish folklore, Christian demonology)
  • Surgat (Christian demonology)
  • Tannin (Jewish demonology)
  • Tartaruchi (Apocryphal Christian demonology)
  • Temeluchus (Apocryphal Christian demonology)
  • Teeraal (Babylonian mythology)
  • Tengu (Japanese Mythology Buddhist demon and Shinto spirit or god)
  • Titivillus (Christian demonology)
  • Tuyul (Indonesian demonology)
  • Ukobach (Christian demonology)
  • Utukku (Akkadian mythology - but could be good or evil in Sumerian mythology)
  • Valefar (Christian demonology)
  • Vapula (Christian demonology)
  • Vassago (Christian demonology)
  • Vepar (Christian demonology)
  • Verrine (Christian demonology)
  • Vine (Christian demonology)
  • Volac (Christian demonology)
  • Vual (Christian demonology)
  • Vucub Caquix (Mayan mythology)
  • Wendigo (Native American Mythology)
  • Xaphan (Christian demonology)
  • Yeqon (Jewish demonology)
  • Yeter'el (Christian demonology)
  • Yokai (Japanese folklore)
  • Yuki-Onna (Japanese folklore)
  • Zaebos (Christian demonology)
  • Zagan (Christian demonology)
  • Zepar (Christian demonology)
  • Zmeu (Romanian folklore)
  • Zin (West African folklore)
  • Ziz (Jewish Demonology)

PLEASE NOTE!

Different cultures define "demon" differently. In some cultures, real demons are specifically fallen angels, in others it includes any creature with monster-like features, for example a centaur would be described by some as a demon due to the fact it has the monster like qality of being half man and half beast.

Therefore it might be best if you choose to think as demons in this four basic categories:

*Fallen Angels/Fallen Heavenly beings

*Dimensional (Exist in alternate universes/Realities)

*Demonic Monsters (Created by the devil, resoult of mans hate/desire/evil will, or black magic)

*Earthly monsters (Monsters/Mythical Creatures that might be classified as demons. Ex: Dragons, Ogres, Centaurs, Minotaurs, etc) 

Please Note that these are not all as cut and dry as they may appear. For example "Evil dragons" could technically fall within all the categories, unless it is a specific type/category/specie of evil dragon, in which case it would fit much more nicely.

Gallery

References

  • Ebon, Martin. The Devil’s Bride, Exorcism: Past and Present. New York: Harper & Row, 1974.
  • Finlay, Anthony. Demons! The Devil, Possession and Exorcism. London: Blandford, 1999.
  • Flint, Valerie I. J. The Rise of Magic in Early Medieval Europe. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1991.
  • Fortea, Fr. Jose Antonio. Interview with an Exorcist: An Insider’s Look at the Devil, Diabolic Possession, and the Path to Deliverance. West Chester, Pa.: Ascension Press, 2006.
  • Goodman, Felicitas. How about Demons? Possession and Exorcism in the Modern World. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1988.
  • MacNutt, Francis. Deliverance from Evil Spirits: A Practical Manual. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Chosen Books, 1995.
  • Martin, Malachi. Hostage to the Devil. New York: Harper & Row, 1987.
  • Oesterreich, T. K. Possession: Demonical and Other Among Primitive Races, in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and Modern Times. New Hyde Park, N.Y.: University Books, 1966.
  • The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha. Vols. 1 & 2. Edited by James H. Charlesworth. 1983.
  • Reprint, New York: Doubleday, 1985.
  • Thomas, Keith. Religion and the Decline of Magic. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1971.
  • Trachtenberg, Joshua. Jewish Magic and Superstition: A Study in Folk Religion. New York: Berhman’s Jewish Book House, 1939.
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